Pedagogy

From feminist pedagogies to critical approaches, teaching strategies and learning methods, we look at pedagogy as a living, breathing organism shaping learners’ abilities to take constructive action.

What We Learnt by Teaching Women to Write Letters

It’s been over 20 years since I started working on women and adolescent girls’ literacy. Twenty years, and I still continue to feel that letter writing is a significant pedagogical tool in the teaching-learning process of any literacy or education programme.

What is the Rigour to Your Compassion?

In Part Two we discuss the limitations of anger, the potential for empathy instead if accompanied by rigour, and the underrated merits of using joy pedagogically.

Filmy Shehar – Queer in Cinema

Acclaimed filmmaker Avijit Mukul Kishore leads The Third Eye’s flagship online curriculum called Filmy Shehar. In the two part masterclass on Queer, we look at diverse ways in which homosexual characters have been represented in Hindi films.

Filmy Shehar – Caste Aur Cinema

In the two part masterclass on caste, we search for obvious and subtle ways caste plays out in the ways mainstream cinema constructs society. We explore standpoints – of filmmakers, films, and images to discover shifting points of view in the ways cinema shows (and hides) caste.

The Snakes and Ladders on the Road to Mobility

Eight of us – four young teenage girls and four women – move about the room imagining ourselves in different places. Sometimes we are walking in open fields, sometimes we are catching the metro. Sometimes we are shrieking in glee and running through unexpected rain.

Filmy Shehar – Chhota Shehar

Acclaimed filmmaker Avijit Mukul Kishore, who is well known for his intimate portraits of people, places and changing urbanisms, leads The Third Eye’s flagship online curriculum called Filmy Shehar. Watch the first masterclass on the Chhota Shehar below.

Girls, Cows and the Cities they Grind to Dust

In Konkani, we use the expression ‘she walked the city so much, she turned it to powder.’ Our mothers said it to shame us for bunking college, sitting behind some guy on his bike and roaming the city.

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